MaisonBisson

a bunch of stuff I would have emailed you about

Media monetization vs. internet advertising

Structural problems The internet is structured in favor of ad networks. Ad spend grows approximately at the rate of inflation, but the inventory of pages on which those ads can appear grows with each new Instagram post (about 100MM per day). Internet advertising is far more automated than print, but the benefit goes to intermediaries and buyers. On average, publishers receive only about half of what advertisers pay for the advertising that appears in their publications. » about 1000 words

Honey cocktails: eau de lavender

Liquor.com’s recipe for eau de lavender, from a larger collection of cocktails with honey. They all look and sound delightful, but I can vouch for the eau de lavender.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 oz Tequila
  • 3/4 oz Fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz Honey syrup1
  • 1 Egg white
  • 1 dash Scrappy’s lavender bitters
  • Garnish: Lavender sprig

Steps

  1. Add all ingredients into a shaker and dry-shake (without ice).
  2. Add ice and shake again to emulsify thoroughly.
  3. Strain into a chilled coupe glass.
  4. Garnish with a lavender sprig.

  1. Honey syrup: Add 1/2 cup honey and 1/2 cup water to a small saucepan over medium heat. (You can experiment and decide how much of a honey flavor you want in your syrup. The more honey you use, the thicker the syrup and stronger in flavor it will be.) Stir until blended. Strain into a jar and seal tightly with a lid. Will keep for 1 month in the refrigerator. ↩︎

Satellite tracking

If you’re not reading Skyriddles blog, then you’re not tracking the sky above. And you might have missed the re-discovery of a satellite launched in 1967 and lost for nearly 50 years.

As it turns out, there’s a lot of stuff that’s been forgotten up there, and quite a bit that some are trying to hide. The blog is an entertaining view into the world satellites, including communication, spy, weather, research, and the occasional probe going further afield.

Notes about Spotify creator features

Spotify often gets bashed by top creators. The service pays just $0.00397 per stream, but with 108 million users listening to an average of 25 hours per month, those streams can add up for creators who can get the listener’s attention.

Spotify verifies artists who then get additional benefits on the platform. Some artists find success the traditional route, some optimize their work for the system, others work the system…and some really work it.

Relevance to other network/aggregation platforms: tiny payments add up, and given a platform, creators will find a way to get and maximize value from it. The critical component is customers.

Glitter, glitter, everywhere

Near the entrance, metal shelves taller than a man were laden with over one thousand jumbo jars of glitter samples arranged by formulation, color, and size: emerald hearts, pewter diamonds, and what appeared to be samples of the night sky collected from over the Atlantic Ocean. There were neon sparkles so pink you have only seen them in dreams, and rainbow hues that were simultaneously lilac and mint and all the colors of a fire. On one shelf, hundreds of jars of iridescent white fairly glowed. The prettiest shade was slightly violet.

From Caity Weaver, explaining a strange trip into a glitter factory. The uses for glitter go beyond cosmetic:

Researchers and zookeepers sometimes mix glitter with animal feed to track animals (polar bears; elephants; domestic cats) via sparkly feces. Plywood manufacturers insert hidden layers of colored glitter in their products to prevent counterfeiting. Because glitter is difficult to remove completely from an area into which it has been introduced, and because individual varieties can be distinguished under a microscope, it can serve as useful crime scene evidence; years ago the F.B.I. contacted Glitterex to catalog samples of its products.

Astrophotography in San Francisco

From the Space Tourism Guide:

Can You See the Milky Way in the Bay Area? Unfortunately, it is very difficult to see the Milky Way in San Francisco. Between the foggy weather and the light pollution from 7 million people, you can imagine that the faint light of our galaxy is lost to view.

But C. Roy Yokingco argues:

Some people say the Milky Way cannot be photographed within 50 miles of a major metropolitan area. Well, this photo of the Milky Way was captured 12 linear miles south of downtown San Francisco, California.

» about 800 words

A mathematical theory and evidence for hipster conformity in four parts

  1. Academic publishes mathematical theory for conformance among hipsters: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.8001.pdf
  2. MIT Tech Review covers it, with a fancy photo illustration using a stock photo of a hipster-looking male: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/613034/the-hipster-effect-why-anti-conformists-always-end-up-looking-the-same/
  3. A hipster-looking male contacts MIT Tech Review to loudly complain about their using a picture of him without asking: https://twitter.com/glichfield/status/1103040764794363904
  4. It turns out the hipster-looking male in the photo isn’t the same as the one who complained: https://twitter.com/glichfield/status/1103044630134882305

The legal case for emoji

Emoji are showing up as evidence in court more frequently with each passing year. Between 2004 and 2019, there was an exponential rise in emoji and emoticon references in US court opinions, with over 30 percent of all cases appearing in 2018, according to Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman, who has been tracking all of the references to “emoji” and “emoticon” that show up in US court opinions. So far, the emoji and emoticons have rarely been important enough to sway the direction of a case, but as they become more common, the ambiguity in how emoji are displayed and what we interpret emoji to mean could become a larger issue for courts to contend with.

From Dami Lee, amplifying Santa Clara University School of Law professor Eric Goldman’s ongoing research into the role of Emoji in legal proceedings. Lee tells us emoji have “shown up in all types of cases, from murder to robbery,” and the examples in the story include solicitation and a civil complaint. Goldman is especially concerned about how the courts will handle the different rendering of emoji on on different devices.