journalism

Parable of the Polygons is the future of journalism

Okay, so I’m probably both taking that too far and ignoring the fact that interactive media have been a reality for a long time. So let me say what I really mean: media organizations that aren’t planning out how to tell stories with games and simulators will miss out.

Here’s my example: Vi Hart and Nicky Case’s Parable of the Polygons shows us how bias, even small bias, can affect diversity. It shows us this problem using interactive simulators, rather than tells us in text or video. We participate by moving shapes around and pulling the levers of change on bias.

This nuclear power plant simulator offers some insight into the complexity that contributed to Fukushima, and I can’t help thinking the whole net neutrality argument would be better explained with a simulator.

Strobist David Hobby on HDR

I’ve been re-reading David Hobby‘s Lighting 101 tutorial while at the same time exploring HDR (Wikipedia’s HDR article is a good read for those unfamiliar with it). The question that eventually came to mind was how the guy that wrote the following feels about HDR? How often have you heard this, usually with a tone of superiority: […] » about 700 words

We Just Have To Go Do The Work

Nicholas Lemann, in a story on blogging and citizen journalism in the August 7 issue of The New Yorker: [N]ew media in their fresh youth [produce] a distinctive, hot-tempered rhetorical style. …transformative in their capabilities…a mass medium with a short lead time — cheap…and easily accessible to people of all classes and political inclinations. And […] » about 400 words

Political Blogging Protected By FEC

Way back near the end of 2005, Lot 49 reported that the Federal Election Commission had basically ruled that bloggers are journalists:

The Federal Election Commission today issued an advisory opinion that finds the Fired Up network of blogs qualifies for the “press exemption” to federal campaign finance laws. The press exemption, as defined by Congress, is meant to assure “the unfettered right of the newspapers, TV networks, and other media to cover and comment on political campaigns.” The full ruling is available at the FEC site. A noteworthy passage: “…an entity otherwise eligible for the press exception would not lose its eligibility merely because of a lack of objectivity…” (emphasis added)

So, yeah, it’s double-edged, I mean that last line is basically the Fox News Channel exemption, but it also gives those bloggers who consider themselves citizen journalists a leg to stand on.

And the folks in that camp should be happy to have the Electronic Frontier Foundation‘s help. As Donna Wentworth says, Bloggers: You Have a Right to Remain Vocal.