Currency

The real Goldfinger: the London banker who broke the world

Goldfinger, the 1964 Bond film, is based on a premise that is incredibly foreign to today’s audiences: moving gold between countries was illegal. Oliver Bullough in The Guardian asks us all to think about that a bit more:

The US government tried to defend the dollar/gold price, but every restriction it put on dollar movements just made it more profitable to keep your dollars in London, leading more money to leak offshore, and thus more pressure to build on the dollar/gold price. And where the dollars went, the bankers followed. The City had looser regulations and more accommodating politicians than Wall Street, and the banks loved it. In 1964, 11 US banks had branches in the City of London. In 1975, 58 did.

If regulations stop at a country’s borders, but the money can flow wherever it wishes, its owners can outwit any regulators they choose.

Linkrot? We Don’t Have Any Steenking Linkrot!

Allen asked, via the web4lib list:

I’m interested in how others handle linkrot in library blogs. Do you fix broken links? Remove them if they can’t be fixed? Do nothing?

Michael answered:

I deal with link rot on blogs as I would with any other publication, print or otherwise: do nothing. The post is dated and users should be aware that links from two years ago may no longer work.

We need to understand that the web is a living, breathing, and sometimes dying organism. The forrest will renew itself.

Dropping the metaphor, link rot is frustrating, but deleting links is deleting history. Fixing links (if possible) or adding updates is another matter, but it’s really only something I’d do for active content.