Cloud

Inter-AZ cloud network performance

Archana Kesavan of ThousandEyes speaking at NANOG75 reports that network traffic between AZs within a single region is generally “reliable and consistent,” and that tested cloud providers offer a “robust regional backbone for [suitable for] redundant, multi-AZ architectures.”

ThousandEyes ran tests at ten minute intervals over 30 days, testing bidirectional loss, latency, and jitter. Kesavan reported the average inter-AZ latency for each tested cloud:

AWSAzureGCP
.82ms1.05ms0.79ms

Within the four tested regions in AWS, they found:

RegionLatency
us-east-10.92ms
ap-south-10.72ms
eu-west-20.61ms
sa-east-11.13ms

Kesavan’s slides and video are online.

Bare metal clouds are hard

The problem, explains Eclypsium, is that a miscreant could rent a bare-metal server instance from a provider, then exploit a firmware-level vulnerability, such as one in UEFI or BMC code, to gain persistence on the machine, and the ability to covertly monitor every subsequent use of that server. In other words, injecting spyware into the server’s motherboard software, which runs below and out of sight of the host operating system and antivirus, so that future renters of the box will be secretly snooped on.

» about 500 words

Kubesprawl

This leads to the emerging pattern of “many clusters” rather than “one big shared” cluster. Its not uncommon to see customers of Google’s GKE Service have dozens of Kubernetes clusters deployed for multiple teams. Often each developer gets their own cluster. This kind of behavior leads to a shocking amount of Kubesprawl.

From Paul Czarkowski discussing the reasons and potential solutions for the growing number of Kubernetes clusters.

Claim chowder: cloud storage

Ten years ago Apple was still doing MacWorld Expo keynotes, and that year they introduced Time Capsule.

My response was this: forget Time Capsule, I want a space ship:

So here’s my real question: Why hasn’t Apple figured out how to offer me a storage solution that puts frequently used items on local disk, and less-frequently used items on a network disk? Seamlessly.

Ten years later: cloud storage is definitely the norm.